Saturday, December 31, 2011

Sylvia's Diary: December 1801 Highlights

  • Sylvia attended a special ciphering school that was taught by a Mr. Botsford.
  • Sylvia made a pair of shoes in mere hours as she then "knit the rest of the day". 
  • In addition to attending meetings three times, she also swept the meeting house one day.
  • Sylvia attended a ball on Christmas Eve at a Mr. William A. Mitchael's house. Two balls in as many months, it must have been quite exciting for her!
  • By far, Sylvia's most wrote about activity was once again knitting (18 mentions this month).
  • Sylvia started documenting her candle making this month. While it is only mentioned three times, it is yet another skill she has.

Have you been following along as I tweet my 5th great grandmother's diary? If not, head on over to @SylviasDiary and catch up on her story. Each tweet is one of her short diary entries and it is tweeted 210 years to the day after she wrote it.

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Olga Hanson's Birth Record

I have been on a quest to find a name of a village or region in Norway where Hans and/or Antonette were born. To help this along, I have been ordering a series of records that might list a hometown. You can read about these here and here. This record was ordered as part of this quest.

Olga Hanson is the daughter of my GGG-Grandparents Hans and Antonette Hanson who lived in Five Points, Akan, Richland, Wisconsin. The only documents I have on Olga are a series of US Census records that list the family. This post will focus on the details of Olga's birth.

I have transcribed the details of this record below:
  • Full name of child: Olga Hanson
  • Color: White
  • Sex: Male
  • Name of other issue living: -
  • Full name of father: Hans J. Hanson
  • Occupation of father: Farmer
  • Full name of mother previous to marriage: Antonette Hanson
  • Hour, day of week, of month, and year, of birth: Sept 20, Sun 8 PM 1891
  • Place, town or township, and county in which born: Akan Richland Co
  • Birthplace of father: Norway
  • Birthplace of mother: "
  • Name of physician or person signing certificate or affidavit: Mrs. N. P. Nelson  Parents of
  • Residence of person last named: Five Points Wis
  • Date of certificate or affidavit: 7 Nov 1893
  • Date of registration: 10 Nov 1893
  • Any additional circumstances: (none listed)

What we can learn from this record:
  • If Olga had a middle name, it was not record on this delayed birth record.
  • She is listed as a white male in this record, even through she was a white female.
  • Gunda had several older siblings, but none of them are listed on this record.
  • Her birth location is supported by the census records of the family during this time.
  • The birthplace of her parents is listed as Norway. Still no village name.
  • The certificate was created on 7 Nov 1893 and filed on 10 Nov 1893. These are the same dates as other vital records for the family.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Gunda Hanson's Birth Record

I have been on a quest to find a name of a village or region in Norway where Hans and/or Antonette were born. To help this along, I have been ordering a series of records that might list a hometown. You can read about these here and here. This record was ordered as part of this quest.

Gunda Hanson is the daughter of my GGG-Grandparents Hans and Antonette Hanson who lived in Five Points, Akan, Richland, Wisconsin. The only documents I have on Gunda are a series of US Census records that list the family. This post will focus on the details of Gunda's birth.

I have transcribed the details of this record below:
  • Full name of child: Gunda Hanson
  • Color: White
  • Sex: Male
  • Name of other issue living: -
  • Full name of father: Hans J. Hanson
  • Occupation of father: Farmer
  • Full name of mother previous to marriage: Antonette Hanson
  • Hour, day of week, of month, and year, of birth: March 27, Thus 7 PM 1889
  • Place, town or township, and county in which born: Akan Richland Co
  • Birthplace of father: Norway
  • Birthplace of mother: "
  • Name of physician or person signing certificate or affidavit: Mrs. N. P. Nelson  Parents of
  • Residence of person last named: Five Points Wis
  • Date of certificate or affidavit: 7 Nov 1893
  • Date of registration: 10 Nov 1893
  • Any additional circumstances: (none listed)

What we can learn from this record:
  • If Gunda had a middle name, it was not record on this delayed birth record.
  • She is listed as a white male in this record, even through she was a white female.
  • Gunda had several older siblings, but none of them are listed on this record.
  • Her birth location is supported by the census records of the family during this time.
  • The birthplace of her parents is listed as Norway. Still no village name.
  • The certificate was created on 7 Nov 1893 and filed on 10 Nov 1893. These are the same dates as other vital records for the family.

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Anna Hellen Hanson's Birth Record

I have been on a quest to find a name of a village or region in Norway where Hans and/or Antonette were born. To help this along, I have been ordering a series of records that might list a hometown. You can read about these here and here. This record was ordered as part of this quest.

Anna Hellen Hanson is the daughter of my GGG-Grandparents Hans and Antonette Hanson who lived in Five Points, Akan, Richland, Wisconsin. The only documents I have on Anna are a series of US Census records that list the family. This post will focus on the details of Anna's birth.

I have transcribed the details of this record below:
  • Full name of child: Anna Hellen Hanson
  • Color: White
  • Sex: Female
  • Name of other issue living: -
  • Full name of father: Hans J. Hanson
  • Occupation of father: Farmer
  • Full name of mother previous to marriage: Antonette Hanson
  • Hour, day of week, of month, and year, of birth: Mon. Aug 16. 4 AM   1880
  • Place, town or township, and county in which born: Akan Richland Co
  • Birthplace of father: Norway
  • Birthplace of mother: "
  • Name of physician or person signing certificate or affidavit: Mrs. N. P. Nelson  by Parents 
  • Residence of person last named: Five Points
  • Date of certificate or affidavit: 7 Nov 1893
  • Date of registration: 10 Nov 1893
  • Any additional circumstances: (none listed)

What we can learn from this record:
  • I never new Anna's full middle name and now we know it is Hellen.
  • She was a white female. 
  • At the time of her birth she was the only child of Hans and Antonette Hanson.
  • Her birth location is supported by the census records of the family during this time.
  • The birthplace of Anna's parents is listed as Norway. Still no village name.
  • The certificate was created on 7 Nov 1893 and filed on 10 Nov 1893. These are the same dates as other vital records for the family.

Friday, December 2, 2011

Family Recipe Friday: Stove Top Pot Roast

Ask any of my Miller cousins what their favorite family meal is and they will say "Grandma's Stringy Meat". The rest of the world calls it pot roast and I'm not sure how it became G-Ma's Stringy Meat, but we love it just the same. Grandma Miller has been making it for as long as I can remember. It is the meal of Sunday dinners, family celebrations, and welcome home.

Most of the family has tried to replicate it at one time or another, but no one can make it taste the same. She just must cook with more love than the rest of us.

G-Ma Miller's Stove Top Pot Roast

  • Brown roast in 2 Tbsp vegetable oil.
  • Sprinkle roast with 2 tsp. salt, 1/2 tsp. pepper, 1/2 tsp dried thyme.
  • Put seasoned roast in a dutch over.
  • Add 2 cups of water and 1 bay leaf.
  • Simmer for 2 1/2 hours.
  • Add carrots, potatoes, and onions.
  • Simmer for 45 minutes longer.
  • Serve and enjoy!

After many attempts, I have a version of it that my husband and I like a lot. We have an electric stove in our apartment and a dutch oven works best with gas in my personal opinion. So, I've started making in our crock pot and I've made two changes to her original recipe. The first is that instead of 2 cups of water I use 32 oz. of Swanson Beef Broth and the second is that I cook it for 4 hours on high (add carrots, potatoes, and onions 2 1/2 hours in).

Family Recipe Friday is one of the many blogging prompts supported by www.geneabloggers.com to help genealogy bloggers record their family histories.  

Thursday, December 1, 2011

Hilda Maria Hanson's Birth Record

I have been on a quest to find a name of a village or region in Norway where Hans and/or Antonette were born. To help this along, I have been ordering a series of records that might list a hometown. You can read about these here and here. This record was ordered as part of this quest.

Hilda Maria Hanson is the daughter of my GGG-Grandparents Hans and Antonette Hanson who lived in Five Points, Akan, Richland, Wisconsin. The only documents I have on Hilda are a series of US Census records that list the family. I recently ordered Hilda's birth record.

I have transcribed the details of this record below:
  • Full name of child: Hilda Maria Hanson
  • Color: White
  • Sex: Female
  • Name of other issue living: Anna H. Joanna A. Magnus 
  • Full name of father: Hans J. Hanson
  • Occupation of father: Farmer
  • Full name of mother previous to marriage: Antonetta Hanson
  • Hour, day of week, of month, and year, of birth: Dec 19   Thurs.   2:30 AM   1884
  • Place, town or township, and county in which born: Akan Richland Co
  • Birthplace of father: Norway
  • Birthplace of mother: "
  • Name of physician or person signing certificate or affidavit: Mrs. N. P. Nelson   Parents 
  • Residence of person last named: Five Points Wis
  • Date of certificate or affidavit: 7 Nov 1893
  • Date of registration: 10 Nov 1893
  • Any additional circumstances: (none listed)

What we can learn from this record:
  • I never new Hilda's full middle name and now we know it is Maria.
  • She was a white female. 
  • As with the previous records, the names of the other issue living are Anna H., Joanna A., and Magnus.
  • Just like in Juliane's birth record, Antonette it is spelled Antonetta.
  • Once again, the full name of mother previous to marriage lists Antonetta Hanson instead of Hoff or Huff.
  • Her birth location is supported by the census records of the family during this time.
  • The birthplace of Hilda's parents is listed as Norway. Still no village name.
  • The certificate was created on 7 Nov 1893 and filed on 10 Nov 1893. These are the same dates as other vital records for the family.

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Sylvia's Diary: November 1801 Highlights

  • Sylvia attended meetings (church) five time during the month and would have gone a sixth time, but she felt "indisposed" and "tarried at home" instead.
  • Sylvia knitted 14 times and most of her knitting was in the evening hours
  • Sylvia sewed 13 times and worked with a tailoress for a day.
  • Sylvia was quite the social butterfly this month having called on or had visitors ten times. She even attended a ball at her Uncle Abel's house the day after Thanksgiving.

Have you been following along as I tweet my 5th great grandmother's diary? If not, head on over to @SylviasDiary and catch up on her story. Each tweet is one of her short diary entries and it is tweeted 210 years to the day after she wrote it.

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Sentimental Sunday: Morel Mushroom Hunting

Morel Mushrooms
When I was young, one of my favorite things to do with my dad was to go morel mushroom hunting. Pops always seems most content in the woods and this was always a special time when we got to go "exploring" with him.

Each spring we would grab handfuls of old shopping bags and then he would load us kids up in his truck. We'd roll the windows down in the truck and chatter away as we drove out to the woods. Once there, Pops would find us each a walking stick to help our little legs navigate the hills of the driftless area.

Soon enough, we'd set off into the woods. Pops always gave a little speech at the beginning reminding us to watch out for critters (we were in their home after all) and then reminded us where to look for the mushrooms. We would spend hours walking up and down those hills, each of us trying to fill our bag the quickest (we are a very competitive group).

Even though we were competitive about filling our bags, I never lost sight of the experience. I enjoyed the peaceful time in the woods most. There wasn't a lot of talking on our parts, but the hills in the driftless area have a sound of their own and it is quite amazing. I'm not even going to try to describe it, as I won't do it justice, but if you ever venture that way you will know exactly what I mean.

Dad and James walking the ridge line.
Hunting the mushrooms was special experience,  but so was eating them! The worst part was waiting for them to soak as it took hours, but when they were ready to be eaten mom or dad would start frying them up. They are best when hot, so we'd all sit around the island in the kitchen waiting for each individual batch to finish and then in mere seconds they'd be gone.

I always wished the season was longer, but all good things must come to an end, right?

A couple years ago, my husband and I happened to be visiting my family during morel season. I, of course, jumped at the chance to get back into the woods for a couple hours and I was even able to convince hubs to join us too! 

It had been years since I had been mushroom hunting, but it was just like I remembered it being. Peaceful togetherness. 

Sentimental Sunday is one of the many blogging prompts supported by www.geneabloggers.com to help genealogy bloggers record their family histories.  

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Surname Saturday: Names, Places and Most Wanted Faces

Names and Places
  • BRIGGS: Wisconsin (Crawford County)  1856-present; Ohio (Morgan County) 1824-1860.
  • DYER: Wisconsin (Grant County)  1856-present.
  • GRAY: Wisconsin (Crawford County)  1880-present.
  • HANSON: Wisconsin (Richland County) 1870-present; Norway Pre-1870.
  • HASKINS: Wisconsin (Iowa County, Richland County) 1860-present; Vermont Pre-1860.
  • HEISZ: Wisconsin (Crawford County) 1850-present; Germany (Prussia) Pre-1870.
  • HORTON: Iowa ( Jones County, Madison County) Pre-1900; Wisconsin (Richland County) 1910-present; Vermont (Franklin County) Pre-1860.
  • JERRETT: Wisconsin (Crawford County, Grant County) 1850-present.
  • LINDLEY: Wisconsin (Iowa County, Richland County) 1910-present; Iowa (Jones County) 1850-1910; Indiana (Warren County) 1830-1850; Ohio (Butler County) Pre-1830.
  • LOMAS/LOOMIS: Wisconsin (Grant County) 1845-present; United Kingdom (England) Pre-1845.
  • MILLER: Wisconsin (Crawford County, Richland County) 1880-present; Ohio Pre-1860.
  • MOOK: Wisconsin (Crawford County)  1850-present.
  • STOHER: Wisconsin (Crawford County) 1870-present; Austria Pre-1880.
  • TYLER: Wisconsin (Clark County, Richland County, Wood County) 1880-present; Ohio (Trumbull County) Pre-1860.
  • WILKINSON: Wisconsin (Crawford County, Grant County) 1850-preset; United Kingdom (England) Pre-1850.
  • WOOD: Wisconsin (Crawford County, Grant County) 1860-present.
Most Wanted Faces
  1. HORTON, Amelia Grace.
  2. HANSON, Hans.


Thomas MacEntee, the mastermind behind www.geneabloggers.com, has revived Craig Manson of GeneaBlogie's meme from 2009.

Friday, November 25, 2011

Juliane Hanson's Birth Record

Juliane Hanson is the daughter of my GGG-Grandparents Hans and Antonette Hanson. Using the online search fields through the record office, I had been able to find birth records for Juliane's siblings, but was unable to locate hers.

Two weeks ago, I happened to do a general search for any Hanson in Wisconsin who was born in December 1886 (her date of birth according to a census record) and wouldn't you know it, up comes a Julian Hanson born on December 31, 1886. So, I ordered it.

I have transcribed the details of this record below:
  • Full name of child: Julian Hanson
  • Color: White
  • Sex: Male
  • Name of other issue living: Anna H. Joanna A. Magnus Hilda M.
  • Full name of father: Hans J. Hanson
  • Occupation of father: Farmer
  • Full name of mother previous to marriage: Antonetta Hanson
  • Hour, day of week, of month, and year, of birth: Dec 31 5 A.M. 1886
  • Place, town or township, and county in which born: Akan Richland Co
  • Birthplace of father: Norway
  • Birthplace of mother: "
  • Name of physician or person signing certificate or affidavit: Mrs. N. P. Nelson 
  • Residence of person last named: Five Points Wis
  • Date of certificate or affidavit: 7 Nov 1893
  • Date of registration: 10 Nov 1893
  • Any additional circumstances: (none listed)

What we can learn from this record:
  • Even though it lists Julian(e) as a male, everything else matches the family!
  • She was a white (fe)male. 
  • As with another record I've ordered on this family, the names of other issue living are Anna H. and Joanna (Janamalia?). This time, however, Magnus and Hilda M. have joined the family.
  • Instead of listing the mothers name as Antonette, it is spelled Antonetta.
  • Once again, the full name of mother previous to marriage lists Antonetta Hanson instead of Hoff or Huff.
  • Her birth location is supported by the census records of the family during this time.
  • Julian(e)'s parents were both born in Norway. Still no village name.
  • The certificate was created on 7 Nov 1893 and filed on 10 Nov 1893.

What we still need to determine:
  • Why did it take 10 years for a certificate to be filed? 
  • Why is Juliane listed as a male?

Family Recipe Friday: Apple Pie Bars

I grew up in Wisconsin's Apple Capital, and as you can imagine, am a bit obsessed with apples. Over the years my mother has baked what seems like a million different apple recipes, but there is only one that rises above the rest: Apple Pie Bars.

They are a staple at family gatherings and rarely last more than a few hours once finished. I'm not joking, we have been known to polish off the entire pan in one sitting!

Now that I am away from home, they are my go-to comfort recipe when I missing my family. I hope you enjoy them!

Directions

Crust
  1. In a large bowl, combine the 2 cups flour and 1 tsp salt; cut in 1 cup Crisco until crumbly (like pie crust). 
  2. In a small bowl, combine 2 egg yolks (beaten) with 1/2 cup milk; gradually add to crumb mixture, tossing with a fork until dough forms a ball. Divide in half. 
  3. On a lightly floured surface, roll each half into a 15” x 11” rectangle. Line an 15” x 11” baking sheet with one rectangle. 
Filling
  1. Peel and slice 8-9 apples; add to a separate bowl. 
  2. In a small bowl combine 1 cup sugar, 2 Tb flour and 1 tsp cinnamon; gently stir mixture into bowl with apple slices. 
Combine
  1. Pour apple mixture over the dough-lined baking sheet. 
  2. Top with remaining 15” x 11” pastry rectangle. 
  3. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake for an additional 30 minutes. 
Finish
  1. In a bowl, combine 1 cup confectioner’s sugar, 1/2 tsp vanilla extract, and 1 1/2 tsp milk. 
  2. Drizzle frosting mixture over bars.

Family Recipe Friday is one of the many blogging prompts supported by www.geneabloggers.com to help genealogy bloggers record their family histories.  

Monday, October 31, 2011

Birthplaces of Hans and Antonette Hanson


I have very limited knowledge of my Hanson line and have only recently began to explore this line past my GGG-Grandparents, Hans and Antonette Hanson. I have several census documents that state their places of birth as Norway, but have yet to locate the town or region in Norway that they once called home. 

They lived in a Norwegian settlement in rural Wisconsin and it has been very hard to separate my Hans Hanson from the others that lived near them. So, I have started ordering documents from archives that could possibly list a birthplace for Hans and/or Antonette. 

My first record was the marriage certificate of their daughter Juliane. I was not able to gather any information on the family's Norwegian origins from this document. My second document was the death record of their first born son, Magnus. This record did list the birthplace of the parents, but only Norway is written down. 

Back to the drawing board...

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Magnus Hanson's Death Record

Magnus Hanson is the son of my GGG-Grandparents Hans and Antonette Hanson. I have very limited knowledge of this family and will share this struggle in a later post. I know that Magnus is buried in the family plot in the Immanuel Lutheran Cemetery in Akan, Richland, Wisconsin. 

I was hopeful that by ordering his death record that I might be able to find out more about his short time on earth. I have transcribed the details of this record below:
  • Full name of child: Magnus Hanson
  • Color: White
  • Sex: Male
  • Name of other issue living: Anna H. Joanna A.
  • Full name of father: Hans J. Hanson
  • Occupation of father: Farmer
  • Full name of mother previous to marriage: Antonette Hanson
  • Hour, day of week, of month, and year, of birth: Nov 30 Sun. 10 P.M. 1883
  • Place, town or township, and county in which born: Akan Richland Co
  • Birthplace of father: Norway
  • Birthplace of mother: "
  • Name of physician or person signing certificate or affidavit: Mrs. N. P. Nelson ^ Parent
  • Residence of person last named: Five Points Wis
  • Date of certificate or affidavit: 7 Nov 1893
  • Date of registration: 10 " 1893
  • Any additional circumstances: (none listed)

What we can learn from this record:
  • It states that he was born on November 30, 1883. This date is supported in the cemetery records, on his headstone, and in the Wisconsin Death Index.
  • He was a white male.
  • The names of the "other issue living" are listed as Anna and Joanna. According to my records, Magnus had two older sisters named Annie and Janamalia (this is likely them, but I am struggling to justify that Joanna is Janamalia).
  • His father, Hans J. Hanson, was a farmer. The 1880 and 1900 US Census records for Hans support his occupation of farmer. The 1900 Census also tells us that he owned the land he farmed.
  • I find it interesting that even though it asks for the full name of mother previous to marriage her name is listed as Antonette Hanson instead of Hoff or Huff.
  • I think the exact details of Magnus' birth are the most detailed of anyone in my family tree!
  • His birth location is what I thought based on the homestead of his parents at the time.
  • Magnus' parents were both born in Norway. (I really wish a village or region was listed!)
  • The certificate was created on 7 Nov 1893 and filed on 10 Nov 1893.

I often find that documents I order give me more questions than answers, and true to form, Magnus' death record has done the same. 
  • No actual death date is listed for Magnus. The cemetery record for his burial and the WI Death Index list his date of death as December 10, 1883. His headstone states his years of life as 1883-1883. Magnus is missing from any future census records with the family.
  • Why did it take 10 years for a certificate to be filed? This seems like a ridiculous amount of time to me, but they did live in a rural area and for all we know they might not have been able to speak English at the time. The 1900 US Census asks if people could read, write, and speak English. Hans could do all three and Antonette could speak it. 
  • One big question still remains: What caused his death? 

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: Lincoln David Heisz



Lincoln David Heisz
Birth - 20 May 1897 in Wisconsin, USA
Marriage to Teresa Stoehr - 13 Nov 1899 in Seneca, Crawford, Wisconsin, USA
Death - 9 Dec 1965 in Boscobel, Grant, Wisconsin, USA
Buried in the Evergreen, Mt. Sterling, Crawford, Wisconsin, USA

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Ancestral DNA: mtDNA Haplogroup Results

Our mtDNA haplogroup results are in and we belong to the H haplogroup. The haplogroup H is predominantly European and originated outside of Europe before the last glacial maximum. It is believed that at least 40% of all mitochondrial lineages in Europe belong to the H haplogroup.

Within the H haplogroup there are several subclades (H1, H2, H3, etc.) and ours is H2. The H2 subclade is found in the highest frequency in Eastern Europe and the Caucasus (it can also be found in Western Asia). The H2 subclade is broken down even further into H2a and H2b. We fall under the H2a division, which is found most frequently in Eastern Europe, but is not found in Asia like the H2b group.

Our exact result was H2a2a (which happens to also be the CRS)! This means that we exactly match the CRS without any mutations or insertions on both the HVR1 and HVR2. I have joined several H2a2a forums online and most of the participants have Scandinavian or Northern European heritage. Which aligns with the research I have done tracing our maternal ancestors to Norway.

However, it gets even more interesting when we drill down even further and look at our CR (coding region). Most mtDNA test do not include this result, but we went with the full sequence test and it was well worth it because we have a very unique CR mutation at position 9299. We have G instead of the CRS's A. From my research online, it appears that our 9299G mutation is a silent mutation, so we shouldn't have to worry about any health related issues.

Our CR 9299G result is pretty rare. The references I have found in forums to it indicate that people with this mutation have ancestors from Scandinavia (3 of us so far). It isn't in the PhyloTree (most complete mtDNA tree available) yet, but once there are more results with this mutation, it could be added.

I will post more as information becomes available.

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Ancestral DNA: Update - 25, 37, and 67 Marker Tests

It has been a year since my last ancestral DNA update. At that time, had over a 1,000 exact matches on the 12 marker test and we had one exact match on the 25 maker y-chromosome test. In the last year, we have had several more matches and I wanted to update the family on these:

12 Marker Test

25 Marker Test
  • We have 2 exact matches (I've emailed both, but not receive responses).

37 Marker Test
  • We have 1 match that is at a genetic distance of -1.
  • We have 1 match that is at a genetic distance of -3.

67 Marker Test
  • We have 1 match that is at a genetic distance of -1.

Please let me know if you have any questions and remember to reference the binders I gave out at Christmas for detailed information on ancestral DNA. :)

Saturday, July 9, 2011

Military Separation Papers - Byron Miller

Last year, I asked my mother (as next-of-kin) to order a copy of her father's military files. She agreed, completed the paperwork and sent them in to the NARA. Her father died when she was nine years old and our family rarely speaks of him. He was served in WWII prior to meeting my grandmother and she knew very few details about his service because it wasn't something he talk about. I was hopeful through his military files we would learn the specifics about his overseas service and the injuries we knew he sustained.

After several months, my Mom received a generic form letter saying that NARA didn't have his record and that it was most likely damaged/destroyed in a fire. At this news, I have to admit that I was more than a little heartbroken. At the time, I felt that this was the one and only way we were going to learn about his history in the Army.

As time passed, I was able to piece together snippets of his service from his military headstone, a picture of him in uniform with a patch on his sleeve, and a book on the battles of Leyte that was in the possession of my Grandma. I felt lucky that I was able to piece these small tidbits of information together and resigned myself to the fact that this is all we would ever know.

Fast forward a year and you can imagine my surprise when my Mom called and told me that Grandma found some "military papers" on Grandpa while sorting through her papers! My Mom, being the awesome lady that she is, ran to the store and made copies of them for me before they were filed away again.

She mailed them straight away and I received them earlier this week. These "military papers" were actually his Honorable Discharge letter and his separation qualification record. Grandma had found the mother-load!

I spent several hours today pouring over these records with my husband, who is fascinated with WWII history. From the information we were able to learn a lot about his training and even a few details on his civilian life. Listed below are the main things we learned:

  • The highest level of education he completed was the 7th grade
  • He was employed as a civilian truck driver before joining the Army in 1942
  • He attended special service school courses in Radio Repair and Operation, Tank Driver, and Radial Engine Mech.
  • He was in the 776th Amphibious Tank Battalion
  • His military specialties were Antitank Gunner and Radio Tender
  • He operated and maintained radios in his tank company
  • He coded and decoded messages in combat zones
  • He had blue eyes (no one had ever told me this before)
  • He was a draftee
  • He was in the service a total of 2 years, 7 months, and 6 days
  • His wounds received in action are listed as "SWA on Leyte Island 20 Oct 1944" (SWA = Seriously Wounded in Action)
  • He was discharged from the hospital at Camp Carson in Colorado
  • He received the following decorations and citations: Asiatic Pacific Ribbon, 1 Bronze Battle Star, Purple Heart, and Good Conduct Ribbon
Having never met the man and knowing very few details about him, the things that stood out the most to me were his signature and right thumb print. After all, the details I had been craving to learn are mere facts compared to the handwriting and thumb print of the Grandfather I have never met.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: Frank E Lindly



Frank E. Lindly
US Army
Sep 17 1901 - Jan 11 1979

Son of Ulysses Grant and Amelia Grace (Horton) Lindley
He was born September 17, 1901 in Iowa
He died January 11, 1979 in Wisconsin
Laid to rest in the Gays Mills Cemetery in Gays Mills, Wisconsin

Monday, June 6, 2011

Sylvia's Diary is now on Twitter!

A couple months ago I was reading through Sylvia's diaries and was once again admiring her brief, but informative, sentences on her daily life in the early 1800's. To this Gen-Y'er, her short choppy sentences reminded me of tweets. As an avid user of Twitter, I wondered what it would be like to read her daily entries, one by one, in the form of a tweet.

So, I got in touch with my contact at the DAR Museum here in DC (the diaries were donated to the museum) and asked if I could tweet the daily entries from the transcripts that they had shared with me. I was given the all-clear a few months ago and am now tweeting away.

The best part is that since her diaries started in March of 1801, I have been able to tweet an almost daily account of from her life 210 years ago! So, come join in the adventure!

Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: Judson, Sarah & Bernice Wilkinson


Sarah Emeline (Gray) Wilkinson
Born September 1879 in Excelsior, Richland Co., Wisconsin
Married Judson W. Wilkinson on 12 Feb 1905 in Crawford Co., Wisconsin
Died 1948 in Wisconsin
Laid to rest at the Union Hill Cemetery in Mt. Zion, Crawford Co., Wisconsin

Judson W. Wilkinson
Born May 1877 in Little, Grant Co., Wisconsin
Married Sarah Emeline Gray on 12 Feb 1905 in Crawford Co., Wisconsin
Died 1962 in Wisconsin
Laid to rest at the Union Hill Cemetery in Mt. Zion, Crawford Co., Wisconsin

Bernice Wilkinson
Presumed daughter of Judson and Emeline (Gray) Wilkinson
Born 1912 in Wisconsin
Died 1912 in Wisconsin

Monday, May 30, 2011

Jasper L. Horton's Obituary

I recently ordered a copy of Jasper L. Horton's obituary and received the following image that ran in the Baraboo Republic on 26 Aug 1929. I've transcribed the text below as part of the genealogy blogging meme Amanuensis Monday.


OBITUARY - Jasper L. Horton

Funeral services for Jasper L. Horton were held this morning at the grave in the North Freedom cemetery, the remains of the former Sauk county resident being brought here from San Francisco, Calif. accompanied by a daughter, Miss Alice Horton. Prayer was offered at the grave by the Rev. E. L. Quien.

Mr. Horton was born at Montgomery, Vermont on March 19, 1836, and passed away at the government hospital in San Francisco on August 19, 1929, at the age of 91 years, 5 months and 9 days. He resided with the daughter, Miss Alice, at Gilroy, California.

As a lad he came to Sauk county and this place was his home up to 12 years ago when he went west.
He enlisted in the Civil war, August 15, 1862, at Loganville and was with Co. E of the 32 regiment of Wisconsin volunteers. He was discharged on July 1, 1865, having served 3 years, 1 month and 14 days.

He leaves to mourn his loss the one daughter of Gilroy, California and eight grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. His wife and one daughter preceeded him in death, and he was buried beside them in the North Freedom cemetery.


Tidbits of Note:
I have listed several tidbits of note from this obituary that caught my attention for one reason or another. I will need to conduct more research on them all as the details of some are not accurate.

  • Jasper was born in Montgomery, Vermont. I had learned through census records that he was born in Vermont, but now that I have a specific town I can narrow down my research.
  • Jasper died in California, which would explain why I hadn't been able to locate a death certificate for him in Wisconsin. 
  • Jasper left Wisconsin 12 years before he died, which would have been around the same time his daughter Amelia Grace died or ran away (no evidence either way).
  • Jasper was a civil war veteran who served for over 3 years.
  • It lists only two daughters for Jasper in his obituary. It doesn't list his son Horace or his other daughters  Mary J. and Amelia who are listed as his children in various census records. One thought of mind is that Alice (mention in the obituary and his youngest child - who most likely wrote this obituary) might not have known of his two eldest children (Horace and Mary J. who I lost track of in the late 1800's)? on the other hand, Amelia only had 5 children, which throws off the grandchildren and great grandchildren totals off, so someone else had kids, but who?
  • The obituary also notes that one of Jaspers daughter not mentioned by name preceded him in death... maybe the cheating grandma didn't cheat after all. 
  • Also, there is no mention of his second wife who is buried near him at the North Freedom Cemetery.

As you can tell, this obituary was full of information that was unknown to me before. However, I am concerned about the accuracy the details stated and am therefore taking this all with a grain of salt.

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Marriage of William Tyler & Juliane Hanson

I recently ordered a copy of the marriage certificate for Great-Great-Grandparents, William J. Tyler and Juliane Hanson. As the State Historical Society, from which I ordered this document, asks that the image not be shared in digital format, so I have transcribed it here below:

Full name of husband,  William J. Tyler
Name of the father of husband,  Charles Tyler
Name of mother of husband before marriage,  Mary Guard
Occupation of husband,  Laborer
Residence of husband,  Richland Center, Wis.
Birthplace of husband,  Highland, Wis.

Full name of wife previous to marriage,  Juliane Hanson
Name of the father of wife,  H. J. Hanson
Name of mother of wife before marriage,  Nellie Hanson
Birthplace of wife,  Five Points, Wis.

The color of the parties,  White
No. and date of license,  83    June 12 1905
Time when marriage was contracted,  June 17, 1905
The place, town or township and county, where marriage was contracted,  Richland Center
Names of subscribing witnesses,  Chas Tyler and Effie Tyler
Name of person pronouncing marriage,  EG Curtis
Date of certificate or affidavit of marriage,  June 17th 1905
Date of registration,  June 28 1905

From this document I have learned their marriage date of 17 Jun 1905. I've also learned that William was born in Highland, Wisconsin, which is a new bit of information to add to my files. However, the birthplace of Juliane is what I have guessed from the census records of her parents at that time. One other item that stood out to me is that Juliane's mother's name is listed as Nellie, not Antonette. Most of the documents I have found list her as Antonette, but this must have been what her family called her. In a way, it makes me feel closer to the family to know her nickname.