Friday, August 31, 2012

Genealogy Road Trip | Marr, Ohio

My sister Courtney joined me for a three-day genealogy road trip in June 2012. I am writing a series of posts that shared the stories and sights of our adventure. This is Part 7.
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Shortly after leaving the Ohio River valley, we found ourselves climbing deeper in the to the hills.
Thankfully we had filled up with gas at lunch, because the longer we drove the less populated the land around us became. We first lost cell service, then the satellite radio went. I was getting nervous, as I wasn't sure exactly where we were going without my iPhone's navigation.

Eventually we ended up in a valley where two roads crossed and we saw a little sign that said "Welcome to Marr, Ohio". Courtney and I grew up in a village of less than 500 people, but even to us, Marr was tiny. A handful of houses, a country school and a general store.

Only a handful of our distant relatives have been to Marr, but each of them has mentioned that the general store is a must-stop. Because several people had mentioned it, I had built up a Mayberry type vision in my head of old men sitting in rockers outside talking about the good old days, while little kids ran inside for nickle candy treats.

In reality, it wasn't quite what I had pictured.
It was nearly deserted, with a nervous looking man standing behind the counter. It was hard to decipher what was decoration and what was for sale. The man behind the counter acted like we had caught him off guard and did his best to make small talk. Eventually, my eyes landed on a hand gun and I decided that it was time to high-tail it out of there. We quickly grabbed two old-school bottles of pop, paid cash, and left.

With nothing in town to see, we did a please-let-me-have-as-cell-signal dance and headed in the direction of the Miller Martin Cemetery.

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Tombstone Tuesday: Joanna Prudden Lindley

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Joanna Prudden Lindly/Lindley

Born on 1735 in Morris County, New Jersey.
Died on 11 Nov 1808 in Washington County, Pennsylvania.
Laid to rest at the Upper Ten Mile Creek United Presbyterian Cemetery in Prosperity, PA.

Headstone Inscription
In memory of Joanna Lindly who departed this life the 11th of November 1808 aged 73 years. 
In faith she dy'd in dust she lies but faith forsees that dust shall rise. Go traveller whoever you be prepare for death to follow me.

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Tombstone Tuesday: Demas Lindley

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Demas Lindly/Lindley
Born on 3 June 1733 in Morris Township, Morris County, New Jersey.
Died on 22 Jan 1818 in Washington County, Pennsylvania.
Laid to rest at the Upper Ten Mile Creek United Presbyterian Cemetery in Prosperity, PA.

Headstone Inscription
In memory of Demas Lindly who departed this life the 22 of January 1818 in the 85th year of his age and about the 60th year of his Eldership in the church. Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth Yea saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours and their words do follow them.

Sunday, August 19, 2012

Genealogy Road Trip | Prosperity, Pennsylvania to Marr, Ohio

My sister Courtney joined me for a three-day genealogy road trip in June 2012. I am writing a series of posts that shared the stories and sights of our adventure. This is Part 6.
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Day 1: Prosperity, Pennsylvania, to Marr, Ohio.
When we left Prosperity that afternoon I knew that more adventures were in store for us as we continued our journey west. We followed a tree-lined two lane road north out of Prosperity. As we wound our way out the valley I wondered what the journey was like for my Lindley ancestors.

Why did Isaac leave? Did he follow a similar route? Did he feel the same mix of sadness and excitement that I felt when I moved away from home and set out on my own adventure? Did he long to return?

With Isaac and his journey west fresh in my mind, we started towards our next stop: Marr, Ohio. Marr is where my maternal Miller line lived in the early 1800's. When I was planning this trip, I couldn't help but notice that both my Lindley and Miller families followed a similar path west.

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After crossing into Ohio, we followed the beautiful Ohio River south. Eventually, we left the river and crossed into the hills. Similar to the drive to Prosperity, Courtney and I felt right at home as we meandered through the valleys and climbed the hills. The whole time we couldn't help but wonder how and why our ancestors on both sides of our maternal line settled in similar landscapes across this great and expanding nation.

Saturday, August 18, 2012

Genealogy Road Trip | Upper Ten Mile United Presbyterian Church Cemetery

My sister Courtney joined me for a three-day genealogy road trip in June 2012. I am writing a series of posts that shared the stories and sights of our adventure. This is Part 5.
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From the top of Lindley Hill Lane, we had a wonderful view across the shallow valley to our next stop: Upper Ten Mile United Presbyterian Church and Cemetery. I've read online that on of my ancestors donated the land for the church and cemetery.

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I first read about the Upper Ten Mile United Presbyterian Cemetery several years ago. As one of the main attractions in the Prosperity for much-researched Lindley/Lindly family, it is often mentioned in online forum posts. Some of these posts even claim that on of my ancestors donated the land for the church and cemetery. So, like most family history-oriented people, I've been wanting to visit since I knew it existed, and I must say, it was well worth the wait.


The church and cemetery were easy to locate, and after successfully navigating the car up the steep drive, we parked near the church. I was a bit stunned at the vastness of the cemetery. From the view on Lindley Hill Lane, I knew the cemetery sat high on the hill, what I didn't realize was that it also continued down the hill and curved around the church. My head started spinning because there were a lot of stones we wanted to locate and photograph and I wasn't sure we would be able to find them all in our short time allowance.

Nonetheless, we were committed and gathered our supplies: camera, a direct ancestors burial list, a list of surname that fit in our tree, pens, and clipboards (a solid writing surface is more useful than you would think when it comes to checking off names and make notes).

The older section of the cemetery appeared to be near the church, so we started there. We were mere seconds into our search and Courtney had already found some Day stones! Luck was on our side and we could barely take a few steps without stumbling into another Day or Lindley relative- it was amazing!

Within 10 minutes we had found the two headstones that drew us to this cemetery in the first place.   The headstones of Demas and Joanna (Prudden) Lindly, our 6th great-grandparents, were well shaded from the afternoon sun under an old maple tree. Their headstones were in amazing condition considering their age.


Demas and Joanna shared a plot with three other stones: Daniel Lindly, Joseph Lindly, and a small stone that was behind the others that simply said "J. L.". I'm going to have to do a bit more research into the others, as Daniel is the only one I can place. The others are likely siblings to our Isaac, but I would like to know for sure.

Click to view larger image.
After wandering for a while longer, we had checked off most of the names on our list and had taken pictures of each. It was so peaceful. It was hard to leave Prosperity, when there was so much to see and I wanted to hang around and talk to people, but our tight schedule didn't allow for it. So, we headed North to Washington, PA, where we found the interstate and headed West.